Wednesday, November 2, 2016

Chorus and Vocal Evaluation Checklist

Chorus groups receive evaluations on several factors and not all of them are musical. Performing is more than just getting the notes right and a technically perfect performance. Whether you are involved in a solo performance or performing as part of a choir, knowing what the adjudicators are looking for will help you get a high score on the performance.

General Information

The general information is going to include the group or performer's name, date, location and basic contact information. This is a standard section completed ahead of the performance. The performer or group will then submit several copies to the judges so that they can take individual notes and come up with a blind collective score.

Repertoire

The repertoire will include all of the works in the concert if it is a performing group. If the evaluation is for a soloist, they may be required to list everything that they performed within the semester. If this is the case, the judges may choose any piece from the repertoire list. Often a soloist is only required to sing two pieces and they may not have to sing the entire piece. An ensemble will typically put on an entire concert.

Diction

Diction is very important for singers. Many people mistakenly believe that if you have a voice you can sing. While this is true on some level and nobody should be discouraged from singing, professional singers have a higher standard. Articulation and clarity of the words is very important for a singer. Singers spend years learning how to properly pronounce words so that they are clear and audible. The judge will grade the singer or group on how well they articulate words.

Appearance

The appearance of the group is another important factor. As performers, singers are expected to dress the part. Wearing jeans and a T-shirt to an audition is highly inappropriate and may even get a singer removed from a studio. Appearance goes along with professionalism and singers need to dress the part. Performers are not just heard, they are also seen, so appearance is important.

Musicianship

Finally, performers are graded on overall musicianship. This includes the ability to accurately interpret phrases, rhythmic precision and how well they interpret the intent of the music. This is mostly subjective, but judges with years of experience are able to accurately assess the performers' level of musicianship.