Wednesday, November 9, 2016

Violin Music & Instruments

The violin heralds as the smallest and highest-pitched string instrument.

The violin has specific types of music and various instrument sizes that make it an ideal choice for those that want to play in an orchestra, chamber or solo field. The different sizes of the violin will make it possible for children and adults to learn to play the instrument. Approach the selection of your violin with some care as getting the right fit makes a great difference in sound and your ability to play.

Violin Sizes


Several violin sizes exist based on a proportion to the full-sized violins. These sizes include 4/4 (full-size), 3/4, 1/2, 1/8, 1/10 and 1/16. Determining the size you need for your body type involves measuring your arm from your neck to the middle of the palm on the hand used to hold the violin, usually the left hand. If your length is between 15 to 18 inches, you should play the smaller violins; 18 to 21 inches indicates that you should use a medium-size violin and all others should try the full-size. Adults should learn to play on a full-size violin, regardless of their arm length. Differences in sound exist between the small and full-size violins, as the smaller violins sound brighter with a narrowly defined sound.

Orchestral Music


The orchestral violinist should study excerpts from the most commonly played repertoire books. This way, they can learn to play the most difficult portions of the music without actually having to study the entire orchestral part. For violinists serious about playing professionally, these books prove indispensable as a resource. Students should work through every excerpt until they achieve the ability to play the music with ease.

Chamber Music


Chamber music requires a different style of playing than orchestral music. With chamber music, the violinist must keep track of his individual part and interpret the music to create a high level of musical expression. Unlike in orchestral music, where a conductor guides the ensemble towards a total vision, chamber music leaves the interpretation to the individual performers. The violinist must lead the ensemble and help to provide an artistic direction based on the input of the ensemble.

Solo Music


The solo career of a violinist forms largely from the ability of the violinist to perform intricate music at a high-level. The violinist should study the basic repertoire and attempt to create an original interpretation of the music. Additionally, playing each piece with precision and careful attention to detail makes for an effective performance. Playing solos on a violin will test even the most accomplished performers. You can’t hide if you make a mistake as a soloist.