Monday, June 8, 2015

How to Play With Both Right & Left Hands on the Pian

Playing with both hands on the piano requires a dedicated approach.

Learning to play the piano requires daily practice and performing consistent exercises. By practicing scales, arpeggios, and chords, a pianist can develop the techniques to perform increasingly complex works. One of the most frustrating elements of learning to play the piano is getting both hands to work together. With practice, students can learn to play with both hands and increase their ability to play increasingly complex works.piano is getting both hands to work together. With practice, any student can learn to play with both hands and increase their ability to play increasingly complex works.

Step 1

Start the metronome at a slow beat, around 42 beats per second. With the right hand, using a separate finger for each note, begin playing from C and up to G, playing one pitch for each beat. Start on middle C and play the white keys up to G. Repeat this until you are able to play perfectly at 72 beats per second. To increase your speed, slowly increase the metronome by two clicks per second. Increase the speed only when you are able to play comfortably at the current tempo. Play in the same manner with the left hand and an octave below middle C.

Step 2

Play with both hands together at a very slow tempo. Place both hands on an octave apart. The right hand should be on middle C, with the left hand an octave below. Using each of your five fingers to play a separate note, press down on C with the thumb of the right hand and the index finger of the left hand. Play D with the pointer finger of the right hand and the ring finger of the left. Continue up the keyboard, using a different finger for each note until you hit G. Practice until you are comfortable and the fingers begin to work together

Step 3

Start the metronome at 42 beats per second. With both hands on the keyboard, play each pitch from C up to G. Continue until each pitch sounds perfectly together. Do not increase the tempo until you are able to do this.

Step 4

Practice playing diatonic thirds in C major with the metronome, using both hands when you are able to play the initial five notes. To play thirds skip every other white note on the piano. Continue to practice this until you can get both hands seamlessly working together and you can play each note at 72 beats per second.

Step 5

Practice playing major and minor scales with both hands. Once you can play major and minor scales with both hands, you can move on to playing chords and start working on repertoire. By developing the coordination between your right and left hand with simple exercises, you can increase your ability and coordination to play more advanced pieces.

Tips

Be patient, and let the coordination in your hands develop naturally. It could take several days to months to get perfect coordination.