Monday, July 4, 2016

How to Make a Fiddle Sound Like a Violin

Making a fiddle sound like a violin does not require much effort on the part of the player since a violin and fiddle are the same instruments. The terms are usually used to denote different playing styles. Fiddle playing uses a looser interpretation of rhythm and generally appears in folk music. Violin technique means music is played exactly as written, with an occasional improvisation during solo sections. However, many classical musicians also affectionately refer to their instrument as a fiddle. So the difference between fiddle and violin playing is not clearly defined. Practice with a metronome at all times.

Concentrate on getting a clean and clear bow-stroke with each movement. The technique in fiddle and violin playing basically stays the same, but a more consistent tone generally accompanies violin playing.

Avoid playing country, blues, folk and bluegrass music on the violin. Stick to music written by classical composers to avoid the harmonies and folk-like melodies of fiddle playing.

Practice your violin vibrato by gently and methodically rocking your finger back and forth on the string while you bow the violin. Fiddle playing has a much wider and erratic vibrato. Keep a measured tempo to avoid your violin sounding like a fiddle.

Learn to play the several classical violin bowing techniques. Detache requires that the violinist alternate each note between an up-bow and a down-bow. Spiccato involves bouncing the bow across the string to create several articulations. Legato involves playing all of the notes under one bow. In classical violin technique, each note must be sounded completely, while in fiddle playing you will often lightly touch notes.