Monday, July 25, 2016

Patterns to Learn Music Notes: A Tutorial

A common technique for memorizing the names of the notes in the treble and bass clef is to use acronyms and using phrases in which the first letter of each word relates to a note on the staff. Staff systems have five lines and four spaces; this allows for easy cognition of visual representations of musical notes. More than five lines and four spaces would make it more difficult to quickly identify on which line or space a note is placed.

Treble Clef Lines


To learn the names of the notes in the treble clef, use an acronym such as "Every Good Boy Does Fine" to remember that the notes on the lines -- from bottom to top -- are E G B D F. You can also create your own acronym; this will help ensure that you have knowledge of the note names and will help you concentrate on each individual pitch.

Treble Clef Spaces


The treble clef spaces are easier to remember than the lines if you remember that when you look between the lines you see your "face" -- the names of the notes in the spaces -- from bottom to top -- spell out the word F A C E. If this is all you remember, you can still identify the other pitches in the staff by moving up alphabetically from the spaces to lines. For example, the first space is F, the line right above it is G, then the next space is A and so on up the staff.

Bass Clef Lines


The bass clef lines have another famous -- and related -- acronym to remember the patterns of notes: Good Boys Do Fine Always. Again, the first letter of each word is the note name of a line on the staff. From bottom to top, the names of the lines are G B D F A. As with the treble clef, you can also create your own creative acronyms to help you memorize the names of the notes on the lines.

Bass Clef Spaces


The bass clef spaces use another well-known acronym: All Cows Eat Grass. In music, you always work from bottom to top when identifying chords and other musical elements. Again, creating your own acronym may help you memorize the pattern.